Case Study Summary_Atkins

I chose Hurricane Katrina as the subject of my case study. Probably my primary reason for the choice was my personal involvement. At the time, I was still working for The Alexandria Fire Department in Northern Virginia. Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) requests starting coming in to Virginia for agencies able to assist int he response effort. The Northern VA Fire Departments started sending down 50 person task forces to assist in providing fire response service to Hancock County Mississippi. We were quartered at Stennis Space Center at one end of the county. We lived in a large tented camp (Camp Buzz) that had been put there to house us. We supplemented some of the few volunteer departments that remained (along with the full time department in Bay St. Louis). So my personal experience there was a little bit of why I chose it. I also posted a video below of storm surge that is quite long, but some pretty interesting footage. It shows buildings getting flooded a ways into the video. I will also post some pictures of my personal experience there. And will detail a bit more about the disaster below.

Hurricane Katrine would be the costliest US Hurricane causing a staggering 108 billion dollars in damage and  changing the region for years to come and to some extent today with the changes in population from those displaced. I think it probably positively impacted the ways governments responds to disasters and how they work better together.  The 2005 Hurricane Season was to be a busy one and a devastating one. Katrina formed differently than others normally form.  This horrific tropical cyclone formed from the combination of a tropical wave, an upper level trough and the mid-level remnants of Tropical Depression Ten. It would make landfall three times in the US, first in Florida and then twice in the Gulf Coast Region. There was a significant loss of Life, approximately 1800 were killed due to the hazards associated with hurricanes. Storm surge and the flooding after the failure of antiquated levee system around New Orleans cause the largest loss of life there. The response of government at all levels was lacking and failure to issue mandatory evacuations early in New Orleans led to a large loss of life. The slow response from the state and federal government and the failure to coordinate resources which is critical were big reasons this response was a failure.

Track of the Hurricane Katrina

New Orleans was the center of most of the news coverage and I thought I would post some pictures from Mississippi, where I was deployed. This area too was devastated, but the loss of life was far less significant. Walking along the Gulf of Mexico, it looked like someone had carpet bombed the entire area as far as the eye could see. The bridge going to Pas Christian was gone, barring a lot of the columns.  Portions of one side of the I-10 bridge going into New Orleans were completely gone, leave concrete columns standing only. The power of a major hurricane is amazing.  The area we were in had water up to the I-10 bridge overpass, which was about 10 miles inland. I could not imagine losing everything as these people did.

Here is Camp Buzz where we spent some of our time. It was situated on The Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.

Here are the FEMA trailers that served as our fire station where I was working out of. We operated out of the Walmart Parking Lot in Waveland, Mississippi. Apparently the initial storm surge height was up to the Walmart lettering over top of the store, putting it somewhere in the twenty foot plus range.

 

The residents did not like FEMA, or even the mention of them at the time

These were common to find, at least in some form

This greeted us the first day we pulled duty in our station

Botswana earthquake: Tremor felt as far away as South Africa and Mozambique

A very strong earthquake struck Botswana just a while earlier. The depth was very shallow. There is still little news I could find this early, but a shallower earthquake would definitely cause more damage. Source was http://bnonews.com/news/index.php/news/id5801

An additional Source indicated the magnitude was 6.8 and the strongest ever recorded there.  http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/787427/earthquake-botswana-largest-ever-south-africa

PUBLISHED MON, APRIL 03, 2017 – 2:09PM EDT

Credit: Google

A strong earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 6.5 has struck Botswana, with shaking felt across southern Africa, including South Africa, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe. Only few details are currently available. (more)

FOR LIVE UPDATES: Twitter, Facebook

The earthquake, which struck at 7:40 p.m. local time on Monday, was centered about 44 kilometers (27 miles) east of Gope, or about 229 kilometers (142 miles) northwest of Gaborone. It struck at a shallow depth of about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles).

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) put the preliminary magnitude of the earthquake at 6.5, making it the largest earthquake on record to have struck Botswana. The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) puts the preliminary magnitude at 6.7.

Shaking has been felt across southern Africa, with reports of tremors being felt in the capital Gaborone and neighboring countries, including in Johannesburg and Pretoria in South Africa. Shaking has also been felt in Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

There was no immediate word on possible damage or casualties but we’e working to gather more information.

Monday’s earthquake is the largest earthquake on record to have struck Botswana, surpassing a 5.9-magnitude earthquake that struck the same region in September 1952.

This is a breaking news alert. Please check back or follow @BNONews on Twitter as details become available. If you want to receive breaking news alerts by email, click here to sign up. You can also like BNO News on Facebook by clicking here.

Stunning footage shows a giant Russian volcano violently erupting for the first time in 250 YEARS

  • A long dormant volcano in Russia began erupting approximately 5 days ago. According tot he article, it has not erupted in 250 years. Scientist were completely surprised by the sudden eruption. I also posted a link to an additional article following this one. There were some pretty spectacular pictures and a video on this page, but I have not mastered getting videos in these posts or whether its possible.
  • The 7,103ft tall (2.2km high) Kambalny volcano is in the Kamchatka peninsula in the far east of Russia
  • The colossal volcano recently became active and spewed out a 60-mile long ash plume visible from space
  • Snow-topped volcano last erupted and poured out lava during the reign of Catherine the Great in the 1700s

This dramatic footage show a Russian volcano awakening for the first time in 250 years.

The snow-covered colossus last erupted in the reign of Catherine the Great but in recent days has spewed out a 60-mile (100km) long ash plume that was visible from space.

Scientists on the Kamchatka peninsula in the far east of Russia had not predicted 7,103ft Kambalny volcano suddenly emerging from hibernation.

Dramatic pictures show a Russian volcano awakening for the first time in 250 years. The volcano's 60-mile (100km) long ash plume was seen from space on a Nasa Terra satellite

KAMBALNY VOLCANO

The 7,103ft tall (2.2km high) Kambalny volcano is in the Kamchatka peninsula in the far east of Russia.

The snow-topped volcano has five eruptive cones across its surface that have all previously spewed out lava.

Kambalny erupted for the first time in 250 years on March 24.

No lava flows were sent out by the volcano but a mighty ash plume that was 60 miles (100km) was captured from space bya Nasa satellite.

The eruption from Kambalny was seen from space and captured by Nasa’s Terra satellite.

The satellite image captured a 60-mile (100km) long ash plume that was spewed out by the active volcano.

Olga Girina, head of the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), said: ‘This is the first serious volcanic event at Kambalny in the modern history of scientific observations.

‘According to researchers, a strong eruption occurred 600 years ago.

‘There is information about its increased activity some 250 years ago.

‘We are keeping a close look at the volcano. It is difficult to say how the event will unfold.’

The first blast came on Saturday, delighting staff at the remote Kronotsky Nature Reserve.

The 7,103ft tall (2.2km high) Kambalny volcano is in the Kamchatka peninsula in the far east of Russia. The colossal volcano recently became active and sent red-hot ash 60 miles high (100km) into the air

Snow-topped volcano last erupted and poured out lava during the reign of Catherine the Great in the 1700s. Only 4,500 people currently live within 62 miles (100km) of Kambalny

Snow-topped volcano last erupted and poured out lava during the reign of Catherine the Great in the 1700s. Only 4,500 people currently live within 62 miles (100km) of Kambalny

Vasily Mitrinyuk, a state inspector, said: ‘This is one of the brightest events of my life.’

Liana Varavskaya, a technician, said: ‘I wasn’t afraid, quite the opposite.

‘I was happy that I could witness such a marvellous natural phenomenon.’

She said there were no tremors or other warning signals before the eruption.

The Kamchatka Peninsula, which is home to dozens of snow volcanoes, is relatively unexplored by scientists. Monitoring tools such as seismometers and webcams, which are used to collect real-time data, are not installed at the volcanic site

Only 4,500 people currently live within 62 miles (100km) of Kambalny. But Nasa scientists warned that the volcano may have spewed out large amounts of sulphur dioxide (SO2), which is harmful to human lungs

Only 4,500 people currently live within 62 miles (100km) of Kambalny. But Nasa scientists warned that the volcano may have spewed out large amounts of sulphur dioxide (SO2), which is harmful to human lungs

Pyotr Shpilenok, director of the reserve, said: ‘We have witnessed a historical event.

‘Photographers and documentary-makers have a unique opportunity to take images of Kambalny’s eruption for the first time in history.’

Kambalny is the southernmost active volcano of Kamchatka, and study of its lava suggest the last eruption was 248 years ago.

Kambalny is the southernmost active volcano of Kamchatka, a peninsula with more than 300 volcanoes. The volcanic region is in the eastern most part of Russia

Kambalny is the southernmost active volcano of Kamchatka, a peninsula with more than 300 volcanoes. The volcanic region is in the eastern most part of Russia

The eruption from Kambalny was seen from space and captured by Nasa's Terra satellite. The region is known as Russia's Land of Fire and Ice for its active volcanoes and huge glaciers

The eruption from Kambalny was seen from space and captured by Nasa’s Terra satellite. The region is known as Russia’s Land of Fire and Ice for its active volcanoes and huge glaciers

Only 4,500 people currently live within 62 miles (100km) of Kambalny.

But Nasa scientists warned that the volcano may have spewed out large amounts of sulphur dioxide (SO2), which is harmful to human lungs.

‘The higher SO2 amounts downwind could be due to multiple factors, including variable emissions at the volcano (such as an initial burst), increasing altitude of the plume downwind or decreasing ash content downwind,’ Simon Carn, an atmospheric scientist at Michigan Technological University, told the Earth Observatory.

The region is known as Russia’s Land of Fire and Ice for its active volcanoes and huge glaciers.

The Kamchatka Peninsula, which is home to 300 volcanoes, is relatively unexplored by scientists.

Scientists studied the remnants of lava that once flowed out the side of the large volcano and suggested the last eruption was 248 years ago

Olga Girina, head of the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), said: 'This is the first serious volcanic event at Kambalny in the modern history of scientific observations'

Olga Girina, head of the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), said: ‘This is the first serious volcanic event at Kambalny in the modern history of scientific observations’

Monitoring tools such as seismometers and webcams, which are used to collect real-time data, are not installed at the volcanic site.

This means any subtle clues that an eruption may occur, including increasing steam-and-gas emissions and changes in the volcano’s appearance, may have been missed by volcanologists.

The lack of monitoring could explain why scientists did not predict the volcano’s latest activity.

Pyotr Shpilenok, director of the reserve, said: 'We have witnessed a historical event. Photographers and documentary-makers have a unique opportunity to take images of Kambalny's eruption for the first time in history'

The volcano seen before its eruption on March 24. The volcano has five eruptive cones that have previously spewed out red-hot lava

The volcano seen before its eruption on March 24. The volcano has five eruptive cones that have previously spewed out red-hot lava

7 students, teacher feared dead in Japan avalanche

Firefighters carry a survivor from the site of an avalanche at Mount Nasu, Japan, on Monday.

Story highlights

  • Students were taking ski and climbing lessons as part of a mountaineering group
  • Thirty-two students and teachers were able to safely get down from the slope

Tokyo (CNN)Seven high school students and a teacher are feared dead after being caught in an avalanche at a Japanese ski resort Monday, according to local police.

Poor weather conditions initially hampered efforts by rescue crews to reach the Nasu Onsen Family Ski Area, a small ski slope on the side of Mount Nasu in Tochigi Prefecture, about 200 kilometers north of Tokyo.
The students were part of a mountaineering club and had reportedly been taking part in a climbing event when local police received a call about the avalanche at 9:20 a.m. local time, according to local officials.
Sixty-two teachers and students were participating in the climbing lesson and 48 of them were in the area where the avalanche happened, police told CNN.
Forty people were hurt, including two who sustained serious injuries.
Thirty-two students and teachers were able to safely get down from the slope, the fire department spokesman said.

Rescue team members climb the mountain at Nasu Onsen Family Ski Resort.

Over a foot of snow fell in the Nasu highlands region between Sunday night and Monday morning, according to data supplied by the Japan Meteorological Agency.
The agency had issued an avalanche advisory warning for the region, after recent warm weather raised the risk. Snow showers are predicted to continue through Monday and into Tuesday.

Rescue efforts are being hampered by heavy snowfall.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe commented on the disaster at a parliamentary session Monday, according to local media. He said that the government would “make every effort to respond to the disaster, while making it a top priority to rescue victims.”
Police initially reported that eight students were feared dead, citing a witness on the ground, but have since revised their estimate.
Source: http://www.cnn.com/2017/03/27/asia/japan-avalanche-students/

Ethiopia: Death toll in Addis Ababa rubbish dump landslide rises to 115

Ethiopia: Death toll in Addis Ababa rubbish dump landslide rises to 115

Ethiopia

Emergency workers in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa searched through a mountain of garbage for the fifth consecutive day on Thursday as the death toll from a landslide at a rubbish landfill site rose to 115.

The Horn of Africa country has declared three days of national mourning for the victims of the disaster that occurred at the 50-year-old Reppi dump on Saturday evening.

Two bodies were uncovered on Thursday morning, rescue workers and residents taking part in the search said, a day after a government spokesperson raised the toll to 113, 75 of whom were women.

“As the number of missing people is still high, we expect to pull more bodies out today and in the coming days,” an emergency worker told Reuters.

Residents of the area say at least 80 people remain unaccounted for. Dozens of victims have so far been buried at the Abune Aregawi Church nearby since Tuesday.

Hundreds of people live near the dump, the city’s only landfill site. Some of the victims scavenged for food and items that could be sold, such as recyclable metal.

The landslide destroyed dozens of homes. Officials in the capital say they plan to resettle most of the tenants and build a waste-to-energy plant.

Ethiopia is one of Africa’s fastest growing economies, but the drive to industrialize has also stoked discontent among those who feel left behind.

Source: http://www.africanews.com/2017/03/16/ethiopia-death-toll-in-addis-ababa-rubbish-dump-landslide-rises-to-115/

Second Source: http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/03/landslide-ethiopia-garbage-170312105503073.html

I thought this a  post relating to discussion points of how much more disasters affect lesser developed countries. Without the significant resources for rescue aren’t available as in MDC’s, the loss of life and injuries will be more significant. The death toll in this event has grown since the initial occurrence as would normally be the case. I’m not sure there would be an adequate accounting of how many people might have lived in this area of slums that was built on a hill near the site of the city’s only dump. It would seem that allowing people to live there would be increasing their vulnerability. According to my secondary source, the landfill has been in use for decades and dumping had not been done there for sometime. Another landfill was being opened in another part of the country and farmer s protested there and re-use of this site began again. The cause is likely the increased land disturbance caused by resuming the active use of this landfill.  This was kind of a natural occurrence (mass wasting) but caused by the actions of man, utilizing this method of trash disposal. Also by allowing people to settle there, increasing risk and vulnerability.  There were approximately 30 plus makeshift homes of squatters there according to the article. Its possible there will never be an actual accounting of how many people were really there and ultimately how many might be dead.

Wildfires burn more than 1 million acres, taking 7 lives

Story highlights

  • By Tuesday, more than 1 million acres had burned
  • Residents evacuated in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Colorado

(CNN) Wildfires across the country had consumed more than 1 million acres by Tuesday night, taking at least 7 lives.

The Oklahoma Forestry Service told CNN the fires burned 400,000 acres, and prompted Gov. Mary Fallin to declare a state of emergency for 22 counties.
Officials in four other states said that 400,000 acres were destroyed in Kansas, 325,000 in the Texas Panhandle and 30,000 in Colorado — not to mention the 6,000 acres burning in the Florida swamps near Naples that resulted in mandatory evacuations.

5 fire-related deaths in Texas

Three ranchers trying to save their cattle died in a wildfire in Gray County, Texas, according to Sandi Martin, coordinator with Gray County Emergency Management.
The three were among five people killed by wildfires in the Texas Panhandle as fires continue to scorch swaths of the Southwest and Great Plains.
The Gray County blaze scorched 100,000 acres, but has since been contained, Martin said. State fire marshals are working to determine the cause.
The three victims were identified as 20-year-old Cody Crockett, 22-year-old Sydney Wallace and Sloan Everett, according to Richard Peet, a county judge and the Gray County director of emergency management. Wallace died from smoke inhalation, while Everett and Crockett were badly burned, he told CNN.
Crockett and Wallace were “an amazing young couple,” according to family friend Lee Tammy Callenback.
Callenback posted a tribute on her business’ Facebook page.
“Cody brought his new found love Sydney to meet us and we immediately knew they were perfect for each other,” Callenback said. “She was an amazing young woman with a bright future as a nurse, but was always trying to keep up with the cowboy way of life.”
The Hoover Volunteer Fire Department said in a Facebook post that all of its units had returned home safely.
One person died in a fire in Lipscomb County, according to Sheriff Kenneth Eggleston — and another fire-related death was reported in Ochiltree County.
Wildfires have forced evacuations in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Colorado.

Firefighters injured

As many as five firefighters were injured while fighting another fire near Amarillo, Texas. Several blazes merged into one massive fire reportedly 12 to 15 miles across, according to Potter County Sheriff’s Office Capt. John Coffee.
The Texas A&M Forest Service is monitoring two major fires that remain active in the Texas Panhandle.
The largest of the two is the Perryton fire, which is more than 300,000 acres wide and only 5% contained. The fire, which is located in Ochiltree and Lipscomb counties, has destroyed two homes.
The other, the Dumas Complex fire, covers 25,000 acres and was 90% contained Tuesday evening.
The Texas A&M Forest Service and the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center forecast that winds, which help stoke the wildfires, will subside on Wednesday.
Elevated fire conditions will return to the area on Thursday, Friday and Sunday, according to the Forest Service.
Gov. Greg Abbott activated state resources to combat the wildfires, according to a statement from his office.

One dead in Kansas

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback said a man died from smoke inhalation in Clark County after getting out of a semitrailer truck he was driving.
“We’re not out of the woods, by any means,” Brownback said at a news conference where he urged residents to stay home if they didn’t have to travel.
“Yesterday was just a particularly incredible day for the state. We saw fire, floods, fail, tornadoes, straight line winds and dust,” he said.
The Kansas fires have accelerated rapidly throughout the day. According to Catherine Horner, spokeswoman with the state Division of Emergency Management, the fires in Clark County have consumed more than 350,000 acres — or nearly 60% of the county.
The fires have destroyed 30 homes and compromised bridges, Horner said, but it’s now at least 50% contained.
Horner told CNN that the fire in Reno County has forced 10 to 12 thousand people to evacuate. Crews went to homes and structures in the area looking for victims. The Kansas National Guard has lent four Black Hawk helicopters to the firefighting effort for water drops.
She also said the fire spread today to Comanche County, where 500 people had to be evacuated.

One fire-related death in Oklahoma

In Oklahoma, a 63-year-old woman died of a heart attack while fighting wildfires alongside her husband in Harper County, according to Dale Spradlin, Director of the state’s Department of Emergency Management.
He told CNN that 125,000 acres were burning in his county alone. The fires destroyed one “inhabited structure,” some barns and “a big hog production complex.”
“It’s 15 to 16% humidity,” Spradlin said. “It’s just like a powder keg out here. A good static charge will start a fire right now.”
An update from the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management said that eight fire-related breathing complications had been reported to hospitals in the area.
More than 185,000 acres had burned in a fire in Beaver County, and fire departments in Payne County responded to five separate fires throughout the day, according to the update.
Fire conditions were not expected to improve through Tuesday night, according to a press release from Gov. Mary Fallin’s office.
Source: http://www.cnn.com/2017/03/07/us/wildfires-texas-deaths/

Quake hits off Japan’s Fukushima, no tsunami risk

AFP | Updated: Feb 28, 2017, 02.42 PM IST

 

(Image courtesy: Google Maps)(Image courtesy: Google Maps)

TOKYO: A 5.6-magnitude earthquake on Tuesday struck northeastern Japan near the disaster-hit Fukushima nuclear plant but there was no fear of a tsunami, Japanese and US authorities said.

The quake struck at a depth of 42.3 kilometres (26 miles) in the Pacific Ocean 34 kilometres east-northeast of the town of Namie, the US Geological Survey said.

The Japan Meteorological Agency said there was no risk of a tsunami from the quake, which caused some swaying in high-rise buildings in Tokyo.

There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries though some local service train services stopped, public broadcaster NHK reported.
Tokyo Electric Power, operator of the Fukushima plant, said no abnormalities were detected.A massive undersea quake on March 11, 2011 sent a tsunami barrelling into the northeast coast, leaving more than 18,500 people dead or missing and sending three reactors into meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear plant.

In November a powerful 6.9-magnitude quake sparked panic and triggered a one-metre (three-foot) tsunami that washed ashore at the Fukushima plant but caused no damage.

Japan sits at the junction of four tectonic plates and experiences a number of relatively violent quakes every year.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/rest-of-world/quake-hits-off-japans-fukushima-no-tsunami-risk/articleshow/57390626.cms
With Japan being a very seismically active place, It would seem Japan is accustomed to earthquakes that occur frequently, as those in California and other west coast United States places. Little damage may occur as building codes are designed to harden  structures from earthquake damage. I can also imagine that the catastrophe that occurred in 2011 is probably also in people’s minds. I can’t imagine a total recovery occurred from 2011 when thousands were killed and the significant catastrophic infrastructure  and property damage and probably wouldn’t be finished for sometime.  Between the Japanese being accustomed to earthquakes, some of which are violent, and the fact that they are a More Developed Country, they are more readily able to recover from the 2011 catastrophe. Granted, these was probably a significant influx of aid and assistance from the rest of the world.

 

 

Descending Tropical Cyclone Dineo to hit Mozambique first, then SA

I did not realize a lot of Tropical Cyclones occurred in Western Africa until i did a little further research. They most often occur during the rainy season from November to April.

JOHANNESBURG – Dineo has continued to deepen overnight and is now packing wind speeds of 120km/h around its eye with wind gusts exceeding 160km/h. Winds of this strength mean Dineo is now classified as a tropical cyclone.

The predicted path still indicates Dineo heading in a westerly direction on Wednesday, making a beeline for the Mozambican coast and will make landfall this evening just to the north of Inhambane, near Massinga. By the time the eye of the storm reaches the coast it is expected to be have obtained ‘intense tropical cyclone’ status with winds estimated to reach 160km/h, gusting over 200km/h. The hurricane force winds will be accompanied by extremely heavy rainfall that will push further inland overnight and into Thursday.Another major threat to life and property is the storm surge that will accompany this tropical cyclone. A storm surge is a tsunami-like rise of the sea level as the cyclone moves ashore. The low central atmospheric pressure literally heightens the sea level underneath the cyclone, while extreme wave heights exceeding 10m aggravate the effect of the storm surge. The storm surge, together with natural tides, will allow ocean water to push in much further inland than usual and can have devastating effects for coastal communities.READ: Tropical Storm Dineo gaining strength, likely to impact SA

The storm will move westwards on Thursday into the interior of southern Mozambique, severely affecting the provinces of Inhambane and Gaza, which borders on South Africa. Although winds speeds will begin to abate, gales will still batter these areas with driving rain continuing for much of the day.

Very strong, gusty winds and heavier showers will gradually start reaching the lowveld and escarpment areas of Limpopo and Mpumalanga on Thursday evening and persist well into Friday. Continuous heavy downpours along with the strong winds may make travel through those areas difficult and in addition, swollen rivers could make crossings dangerous and travellers should avoid low-lying bridges in such conditions.

The remnant low of Dineo will move across northern Limpopo on Friday, bringing gusty easterly winds to the province as well as Mpumalanga and Gauteng where wind speeds could exceed 50km/h. Winds over these areas could be strong at times and there will still be heavy downpours affecting Limpopo and eastern Mpumalanga.

Thereafter the low is expected to move into Botswana, although showers will continue in the north of South Africa and gusty conditions will spread to North West on Saturday, while calming elsewhere.Tropical weather systems of this nature are notorious for changing direction and movement suddenly and the South African public are urged to closely monitor weather forecasts and updates issued for Tropical Cyclone Dineo.

For more updates watch eNCA, channel 403 on DSTV, and follow us on twitter @eNCAWeather

Source for this article was:   http://www.enca.com/south-africa/descending-tropical-storm-dineo-to-hit-mozambique-first

Source for additional info was: https://www.jacarandafm.com/news/news/cyclone-dineo-history-severe-weather-patterns-mozambique/

Seismologists concerned of intense seismic activity north of Lesvos

Seismologists concerned of intense seismic activity north of Lesvos

Posted by in Very Mix

Three earthquakes with magnitude around and above 5 on the Richter scale shook the island of Lesvos in the Eastern Aegean Sea on Monday, February 6th 2017.

The first earthquake hit at 5.51 am with 5.2 R, the second at 12:58 on with 5.6R and the third at 1:45 pm with 4.9R.

The epicenter of the earthquakes was located within the Turkish territory, about 34 km north of Mytilene, at a focal depth of 10 km.

*several geodynamic institutes give different magnitudes. The magnitudes of the earthquakes off Lesvos are from US and Greek earthquake observatories.

The succession of earthquakes began with a moderate tremor of 5.1 on the Richter scale in the early morning and a lighter 4.2-Richter magnitude quake at 13:45, as well as a series of 13 intervening aftershocks.

The phenomenon of three strong earthquakes have alerted Greek seismologists with some of them to believe that an old rift has been activated and a bigger earthquake was possible.

Seismology professor at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Konstantinos Papazachos, expressed his concern about the activation of a rift 10 to 15km long north of Levos.

“When we have accumulated earthquakes this is an operative event for greater earthquake,” Papazachos told Skai TV on Tuesday morning. “What concerns me more is the fact that it is one of the main faults that historically have hit the island” he added recalling the powerful earthquake of 6.6R in 1865 that had caused damages in the north of the island.

Papazachos spoke of a “difficult” phenomenon in progress and stressed that such earthquakes do not diffuse the energy pressure.

The professor urged the local community to take preventive measures.

Seimsologist Giorgos Chouliaras said also the they were concerned about the ‘history’ of the said fault line.

Efthimios Lekkas, seismologist at the Athens University Geology and Geoenvironment Department, reassured the residents of the islands of Lesvos and Chios, that was also shaken by the tremors, that there was no cause for concern.

Lekkas said seismologists will be monitoring the phenomenon closely, however, since it is occurring in an area with several rifts, though not the very destructive Anatolia rift.

Image result for γεωδυναμικο ινστιτουτο σεισμοι

A period of 48 hours must pass before the phenomenon can be said to be fully completed, he added.

Tuesday morning, another earthquake of 5.2R magnitude shook the western province of Çanakkale, Turkish media reported adding that at least four people were injured on Monday. There were damages in eleven villages affected by the earthquakes on Monday.

Related image

Fault lines in Turkey and Greece: the fault line north of Lesvos seems to be one of the side fault line of the North Anatolian Fault line that caused the powerful 7.4R in Izmit in 1999 killing thousands of people.

Image result for turkey fault lines

There is a high concentration of fault lines in northwestern Turkey, where the Eurasian and African plates meet; a few faults and ridges also appear under the Mediterranean.

It would seem the Aegean has gone through periods of seismic activity due to the tectonics discussed and also being a volcanic region. Hopefully this isn’t a bad omen with this marked increase in seismic activity  in the very recent past.

Sources:

http://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2017/02/07/seismologists-concerned-of-intense-seismic-activity-north-of-lesvos/

Also referred to  http://greece.greekreporter.com/2017/02/07/greek-seismologists-fear-activation-of-fault-may-cause-6-6-richter-earthquake-off-lesvos/#sthash.0pK464aY.dpuf

Also referred to http://greece.greekreporter.com/2017/02/06/magnitude-5-2-earthquake-rattles-lesbos-island-in-greece/
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